Stamp and Go! {Jamaican Codfish Fritters} for #SundaySupper

Feb 3, 2013 by

Today is a BIG #SundaySupper. Its Superbowl Sunday and we have so many good dishes for this spectacular occasion. It’s spectacular for a few reasons. If you love American Football, then you’ve probably been eagerly anticipating this day. If you love food, well there will certainly no shortage of food today. If you’re like me, you’ll be looking forward to the Superbowl commercials and the half-time performance. Yes, that really is all that I’m looking forward to. Well that and these Jamaican Codfish Fritters! It’s a wonderful snack or side dish/appetizer and is one of my favourite Jamaican treats. My Grandmother used to make these fritters for me. I just loved them. The saltiness of the Codfish will always win me over. I made them for the first time and now I’m in fritter heaven!

 

Stamp & Go_Codfish Fritters_1

 

My recipe today was taken from my very special Jamaican cookbook by Enid Donaldson, “The Real Taste Of Jamaica”. This book has not failed me yet! I’m comforted knowing that it keeps me close to home for so many occasions including game time!

 

Stamp and Go! {Jamaican Codfish Fritters}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Salted (deboned) Codfish
  • 2 Cups All Purpose Flour, Unbleached
  • 2 Onions, Finely chopped
  • 2 Tomatoes, finely chopped, seeds removed
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 Stalks Escallion, finely sliced
  • 2 Tsp Black Pepper
  • 1/2 Scotch Bonnet Pepper, finely chopped (I omitted this ingredient)
  • 2 Tbsp Vegetable Oil + more for frying
  • 2 Tsp Baking Powder
  • 1 1/2 Cups Water, at room temperature

Instructions

  1. Soak codfish overnight in water or bring to a boil twice (for 12-15 minutes), draining and adding fresh water after each boil.
  2. Drain and rinse the codfish under running cold water
  3. Using a fork or your fingers, flake the codfish into small pieces, taking care to remove any remaining bones
  4. To a small skillet, add oil and allow to get hot. Add onion, garlic, tomatoes and escallions. Sautee until soft about 5 minutes. Add black pepper then combine. Remove from heat and allow to cool
  5. Add codfish to the seasonings. Stir to combine
  6. In a medium bowl, add flour and baking powder. Stir to incorporate
  7. add codfish mixture to the flour and stir to combine.
  8. Add water gradually, mixing by hand until a firm but loose batter is achieved
  9. Add by about 3 tbsp at a time and fry in oil at medium heat on both sides (about 3-5 mins) until golden brown and cooked through
  10. Transfer to absorbent paper towels to get rid of any excess oil.
  11. Transfer to a platter and serve warm
http://lovelypantry.com/2013/02/stamp-and-go-jamaican-codfish-fritters-for-sundaysupper/

 

For those who are not familiar with Salted Cod/Cod Fish/Salt Fish – this is what it looks like straight out of the package. This looks pretty nice compared to what I grew up seeing. This is from an 11oz package. I used half of it to make this recipe. I got mine from the local West Indian Market but I have seen it in the regular supermarket also.

 

Stamp_and_Go_Salted Codfish

Salted Cod Fish direct from packaging

 

I remember having to flake codfish on a Saturday night in preparation for Ackee & Salt Fish on Sunday morning before church. The fish we had then wasn’t as refined and certainly was not de-boned. I had to use my fingers and flake while removing bones from the fish. Not a glamorous task at all. But I love Saltfish so it had to be done. I would flake the fish while my Mom would prepare the dumpling dough.

Once the fish has been boiled twice, taste the fish to see if it is to your liking. You don’t want to boil out all the salt. It should in fact still be salty. Keep in mind that it is going to be placed in a batter that will likely reduce the saltiness. Here is what the codfish looks like once cooled and flaked.

 

Stamp_and_Go_Codfish_Fritters-3

Flaked Cod Fish

 

 

Stamp_and_Go_Codfish_Fritters_ingredients

Lets make Stamp & Go!

 

While sautéing the seasoning, you will notice the wonderful fragrance as they combine. I decided not to add Scotch Bonnet pepper this time but I’m sure I will the next time. I added black pepper instead.

 

Stamp & Go_ Seasoning + Fish

Sautee the onion, garlic, tomatoes and escallions. Combine with codfish.

 

Creating the batter was interesting. The recipe did not state how much water to use. I added 1/4 Cup of water at a time until I arrived at a nice consistency. I tested out a fritter to see how it came out after adding a cup of water to the batter. I only needed half a cup more to get it right. Fry these fritters at medium heat. And do not leave the skillet unattended while browning these fritters.

 

Stamp & Go_Prep

 

Wouldn’t you like to see these on your Superbowl party platter?  These are a definite crowd pleaser.

 

Stamp_and_Go_Codfish_Fritters_platter

Codfish Fritter Platter

Grab yourself a plate and dig in!

 

Stamp_and_Go_Codfish_Fritters_plate

Jamaican Cod Fish Fritters, also known as Stamp & Go

 

Be sure to visit the rest of the #SundaySupper team to see the amazing game day buffet items.

#SundaySupper Super Bowl Appetizers & Snacks:

#SundaySupper Super Bowl Main Dishes:

#SundaySupper Super Bowl Desserts:

 

#SundaySupper Super Bowl Tablescape:  10 Tips For A Winning Superbowl Buffet Table from An Appealing Plan

***

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter on Sunday, February 3rd to talk all about our Super Bowl Recipes!

We’ll tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world.

Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET and you do not want to miss out on the fun.

Follow the #SundaySupperhashtag, and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.

Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos!

 

 

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Ackee & Saltfish

Apr 10, 2012 by

Ackee, oh Ackee. Ackee is Jamaica’s national fruit. Ackee paired with Saltfish (Salted Codfish) is Jamaica’s National Dish. This is a dish that is near and dear to my heart, as my Mother always prepared it for my family on the weekend. She makes it so very well. I remember having to “flake” the saltfish (not often, a few times perhaps) to remove the bones and to reduce them into smaller pieces the night before for easy preparation in the morning. I hated having to pick out the bones, but boy did I enjoy eating it! I was in the mood for traditional Jamaican fare so I gathered my ingredients to make Ackee and Saltfish served with fried Bammy and fried Plantains.

 

Ackee and Saltfish with Bammy and Plantain

 

Ackee & Saltfish
Recipe Type: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Author: Lyn of The Lovely Pantry
Prep time: 40 mins
Cook time: 50 mins
Total time: 1 hour 30 mins
Serves: 6
Jamaica’s National Dish, Suitable for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner. It can be served with Fried Dumplings, Boiled Dumplings, Fried Bammy, Boiled Banana, Fried Plantains, Boiled Yam, Roast Yam or White Rice
Ingredients
  • 2 Dozen Ackees (or 2 Tins of Ackee)
  • 1/2lb Salted Codfish
  • 1/4 Cup Coconut Oil (or vegetable oil)
  • 1 Medium Tomato, chopped
  • 1 Red Sweet Pepper, chopped
  • 1 Green Sweet Pepper, chopped
  • 1 Onion chopped, or thinly sliced
  • Salt and Pepper
  • A few Pimento seeds (optional)
  • 1 Tsp All Purpose Seasoning (optional)
  • A pack of Bammy (8 small round Bammies)
  • 1 Ripe Plantain
  • 1 Cup Milk
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable Oil
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • Oil for frying the plantain
Instructions
  1. Soak the saltfish overnight in a covered pot. In the morning, pour off the water. Add fresh water and bring to a boil. Taste the fish to ensure that most of the salt has been boiled off. If it is very salty, pour off the water, add fresh water and boil again. This should be enough. The saltfish should not be bland. Pour off water and allow to cool. Using your fingers, break the fish into small pieces while removing any present bones. Be careful, the bones can be very small. You should end up with a heaping cup full of flaked saltfish.
  2. If using canned ackees, drain liquid from the ackees and add to a pot of boiling water for about 2-3 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  3. If using fresh ackees, boil in salted water for about 15 minutes, or until ackees can be pierced with no resistance with a fork. Do not overcook. Drain and set aside
  4. In a large skillet or dutch oven, warm the oil over medium heat
  5. Add onion, tomatoes and sweet peppers. Sauté until softened about 5 minutes
  6. Add saltfish and stir to combine
  7. Add ackee to the pot
  8. Add salt and pepper
  9. Give a gentle stir so that you don’t break up the ackee
  10. Cover and allow to simmer for about 15 minutes
  11. Gently stir to fully combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste
  12. For the bammies:Dissolve sugar in a cup of milk. Pour into a shallow dish. Place bammies into the milk and leave for about 5 minutes. Flip onto the other side. The bammy will absorb the milk.
  13. In a medium-hot skillet with oil, fry the soaked bammy in oil and butter until golden brown, about 8 minutes on each side
  14. Place on a paper towel to soak up oil from the bammy. Set aside
  15. Thinly slice the plantain on the diagonal. Fry each piece in hot oil until brown on both sides. Place on paper towel to absorb oil
  16. Serve and enjoy
Notes

Be careful not to overcook the ackee as it will get extremely soft and turn into mush
If you do not have saltfish available, crispy bacon is a great substitute. Just fry and break into bits.
A whole Scotch Bonnet pepper is an optional ingredient and would be added along with the ackee and allowed to simmer. Remove before serving, taking care not to pierce the pepper

 

 

Charlene, a friend and a Jamaican photographer, has allowed me to use her photograph of Ackee in the pods so I can share with you all. This is not something that you can see in North America. I grew up with an Ackee tree on my family property so I saw this often. Here in Canada (and in the United States), you buy Ackee from the tin. I’ve had it an it is not at all bad. It’s a great way to still have Ackee.

To see more of Charlene’s beautiful photography, please click on the photograph.
Fresh - Ackee

 

Soak the saltfish overnight, or at least for a few hours. I soaked mine overnight then started the boiling process in the morning to reduce the salt. The fish should still have a certain amount of salty taste to it, otherwise it won’t taste great and then you’ll have to add salt back to the dish. In this photograph, I have about a pound of saltfish but I only used half. I reserved the other half for another special recipe.

 

Boiled Saltfish (Salt Cod)

 

Lovely fresh ingredients (I didn’t end up using the scallion)

 

Sweet Peppers, Onion, Tomato, Scallion

 

 

The main ingredients:

 

 

Bammy is a thick version of a flatbread made from cassava. Bammies can be soaked in either milk or coconut milk. Then it can be baked or fried until browned and cooked through. It has a very light and delicate taste and can be enjoyed with a variety of meals. It’s great for soaking up gravy!

 

Bammies soaked in milk

 

Such an amazing aroma.

 

Vegetables in the pot

 

Ackee and Saltfish are cooked though, and ready to be served

 

Ackee and Saltfish

 

Ackee and Saltfish is likely to be served with fried dumplings. My Mom is an expert at making fried dumplings. I have yet to try my hand at that so Bammies are where it’s at until I  try the dumplings. This is generally a breakfast dish, but I have had it for dinner too, as I did here.

 

Ackee, Saltfish, Bammy, Plantains

 

 

I hope you enjoyed today’s post. I really like making traditional Jamaican dishes and sharing with everyone. I don’t generally prepare traditional meals but I’m willing to try every now and again.

Have a super week!

~Lyn

 

 

 

 

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