Jamaican Hot Chocolate

Jan 22, 2013 by

Brrrrrrr…

Seriously. I am currently in a deep freeze. I know that at this moment in time, in certain parts of Canada, they are experiencing temperatures somewhere around -45C…give or take a few degrees. This post isn’t meant to complain. Really, it’s not. How can I complain when we are only somewhere around -12C? Oh, and that’s the “high”. The low is a frightening -23C. Extreme cold alerts always have me wondering how I can remain indoors until it is at least -5C. I’m “okay” around -5C. Since life has a wonderful way of happening daily, staying indoors isn’t practical. So when it’s really really cold, its time for some tropical flavour to warm me up and bring a smile to my face.

This is a quick post since I’m missing my blanket that is strategically placed in front of the fireplace. It’s probably missing me too. So we will have to be reunited shortly.

 

Hot Chocolate-3

Jamaican Hot Chocolate

 

Jamaican Hot Chocolate

2 oz Jamaican Chocolate (1 chocolate ball), shredded or coarsely chopped

2 Cups Water

1 Cinnamon Leaf

1/8 Tsp Ground Nutmeg

1/2 Tsp Vanilla

1/4 Cup Sweetened Condensed Milk

1/2 Cup Milk (optional)

Instructions

In a medium pot, add water, cinnamon leaf and chocolate and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and allow to simmer for about 20 minutes

Add salt, nutmeg, vanilla, milk and condensed milk. Stir to combine.

Strain and sweeten with a little sugar if needed.

Serve and enjoy hot!

This recipe yields about 3 mugs of “Coco Tea” 

 

Typically, you grate the chocolate but as you see here, I started but my patience got the better of me. I chose to coarsely chop the chocolate instead. The goal is to break it down so that it cooks faster.

 

Hot Chocolate-2

Jamaican Chocolate coarsely chopped

 

This Jamaican beverage is known as Hot Chocolate Tea or simply Coco Tea. It tastes nothing like Swiss Miss or Nestle or whatever else you find at the grocery store. It is quite rustic, and rich. It’s also quite coarse as it does not completely dissolve, so straining is an absolutely necessary step (in my opinion) in order to fully enjoy this beverage without having to clear your throat every few sips.

 

Hot Chocolate-1

Jamaican Chocolate, Nutmeg and Cinnamon Leaf

 

Coco Tea is typically a breakfast beverage (especially around Christmas). I remember the BEST Coco Tea I’ve ever had, was at a hotel restaurant in Portland, Jamaica (a beautiful, rustic and fairly untouched part of the island located on the south coast). They refused to tell me their secret ingredient. I suppose that means I will be returning to the hotel to savour their wonderful chocolate bliss. It’s wonderful to have on a Sunday morning with a nice big traditional breakfast. But for me? It keeps me warm and comforted on cold winter nights. I’m glad I have a small stash to last me a little while.

~Lyn

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Jamaican Sorrel for #SundaySupper

Dec 16, 2012 by

There is always something new going on in my kitchen.  This beverage is a big deal…to the husband. Sorrel is a drink he loves and until now, he had to depend on someone giving it to us as a gift or going to Jamaica to have the real authentic drink. Sorrel is a popular beverage to have during the Christmas season. I’ll confess ~ I never really liked sorrel. Give me some other tropical drink. Give me soursop juice, carrot juice or fruit punch. Just not sorrel. Well, it seems that my taste is changing. I don’t know what I was thinking. Sorrel is amazing! Around this time of year in Jamaica, most households, family gatherings or formal gatherings will have Sorrel in their selection of beverages.

Today’s #SundaySupper theme is Holiday Drinks and Appetizers and our host is Connie from The Foodie Army Wife. A big shout out to my Bestie for giving me “The Real Taste Of Jamaica” by Enid Donaldson! It’s getting good use! I was happy to have it so I could share this recipe today. Please be sure to check out the other beverages and appetizers brought to you by the #SundaySupper family. You’ll need ideas if you are hosting or attending a holiday gathering.

Everyone that I’ve asked makes sorrel a little differently. Some people add a little wine to it. Some add a “little” White Rum, which is true in most cases. I didn’t do too much adapting but I plan to tweak it a bit more on the next round. I’ll add more ginger and just a little less sugar. This was a bit sweet for me but easily rectified by diluting it and adding ice. Sorrel is best served ice-cold. For my household, I omitted the rum because I wanted to be able to drink it at any time during the day, and also I wanted my children to be able to taste it. My children drank it several times, and that truly made me happy.

 

Jamaican Sorrel-9

Jamaican Sorrel

 

 

Jamaican Sorrel

A traditional Jamaican Beverage for the Christmas Holiday Season

Ingredients

  • 3 Cups Dried Sorrel
  • 1 inch Root Ginger, shredded
  • 12 Whole Cloves
  • 5 Pimento Leaves
  • 6 Cinnamon Leaves
  • 12 Cups Boiling Water
  • 2 Cups Granulated Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp Freshly squeezed Lime Juice
  • 1 Tbsp Rice

Instructions

  1. Rinse the Sorrel sepals in a strainer under cold water for just a few minutes
  2. In a very large pot, add sorrel, ginger, rice grains, cloves pimento leaves and cinnamon leaves
  3. Pour boiling water over the contents of the pot and cover for 24 hours
  4. Strain the liquid into another large pot and add sugar and lime juice
  5. Stir to combine
  6. Transfer into bottles and chill
  7. Serve ice cold

Notes

This yields just over 2 litres of sorrel (optional) 1/4 Cups White Rum can be added to the pot after the sorrel has been strained and sweetened

http://lovelypantry.com/2012/12/jamaican-sorrel-for-sundaysupper/

So some of you may be wondering…”What is Sorrel?”. Jamaican Sorrel is a type of Hibiscus plant (Hibiscus Sabdariffa). The sepals are used either fresh or dried to make a refreshing cold beverage or a hot tea. Sorrel can also be used to make Jams and Jellies. Sorrel is seasonal and is ready around December-January, making it the perfect holiday beverage.

 

Jamaican Sorrel Collage

 

This is a very important step. Steeping the Sorrel for at least 24 hours allows for a very rich, full-bodied liquid. I allowed mine to steep a little longer. I love all the natural ingredients that make up this drink. If unsweetened Sorrel wasn’t so extremely sour, I’d omit/reduce the sugar. But the sugar is a very necessary component. Substitutions will ruin this drink.

 

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Sorrel

 

Once strained, sweetened and chilled – Sorrel is ready to be enjoyed!

 

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Jamaican Sorrel

 

 

The perfect glass of Sorrel …

 

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Jamaican Sorrel

 

 

Sorrel is an excellent gift. It can be made with or without alcohol – either way, it is extremely enjoyable. It can also be kept in the fridge for a long period of time! Especially with the addition of rum as a preservative.

 

 

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Jamaican Sorrel – Gift

 

 

Holiday Cocktails

 

Holiday Appetizers or Hors d’oeuvres

 

 

Do you have a favorite dish or beverage to take to a party?  Please join on us on Twitter throughout the day during#SundaySupper on December 16th.  

We’d also love to feature your recipe for holiday parties on our #SundaySupper Pinterest board to share them with all of our followers, too.

** Due to the tragic events in Newtown, Connecticut, we will not be having a live chat this Sunday December 16, 2012. Our hearts and prayers go out to the souls lost and the affected families. **

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Jamaican Carrot Drink

Sep 20, 2012 by

Greetings friends of The Lovely Pantry! I have certainly been missing in action for the past few months. Mainly because I went to Jamaican for most of the summer. I usually take the time to spend with my family and my friends during the summer months. The connection is very important to me. Sometimes, you need to reconnect and rejuvenate, and that’s exactly what I did. I’ve been trying to get back into blogging but obstacles just keep popping up. Since I’m no quitter – I’m going to press on and continue what I really enjoy doing with the friends that inspire and encourage me every day. I should also try to make nice with my scale. I did not hold back when it came to food while I was in Jamaica! LOL!

A big hearty THANK YOU to my fabulous Food Blogger friends who did not hesitate to guest post for me while I was away! Sofie, Chung-Ah, Renee, Anuradha, and Sandra ~ You guys are so AWESOME!

Today’s post is a wonderful refreshing drink that is quite lovely with a Sunday dinner, or a special drink for entertaining. I got the recipe from a book given to me by the BESTIE a few months ago. I’ve added it to my growing collection of Jamaican Treasures and I’m so happy to be sharing the recipe with you here. The book is called The Real Taste of Jamaica by Enid Donaldson. I had it on my wish list for so long! I believe I had the book years go but gave it away because I wasn’t really into cooking at that time. I’m glad I have it once again! I’m keeping this copy! It has sentimental value :-)

 

Jamaican Carrot Drink – Perfect for a Sunday afternoon beverage

 

Jamaican Carrot Drink

Recipe Type: Drink, Juice, Beverage
Cuisine: Jamaican
Author: Lyn of The Lovely Pantry, original recipe from A Real Taste of Jamaica by Enid Donaldson
Prep time:
Total time:
Serves: 6
A refreshing drink made from carrots, water and evaporated milk
Ingredients
  • 2 Cups Diced Carrots
  • 2 Cups Water
  • 1 Cup Evaporated Milk (Reduced Fat)
  • 1/2 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1 Tsp Vanilla
  • 1/2 Tsp Grated Nutmeg
  • 1/2 Cup Ice Cubes
Instructions
  1. In a blender, add carrots and water
  2. Pulse until blended, in intervals for about a minute
  3. Strain the carrot mixture into a jug
  4. Rinse the blender jug
  5. Pour the strained juice back into the blender and add the milk, sugar, vanilla, nutmeg and ice cubes
  6. Blend again in intervals for no more than a minute
  7. Strain a second time into the serving jug and refrigerate
  8. Serve cold and enjoy
Notes

I found that it was best to strain the liquid twice in order to yield a much smoother and more refined drink. I used 2 different sized strainers. The second time I used a much finer sieve.

 

Jamaican Carrot Drink with freshly grated Nutmeg

 

I’m just too excited. I love books – of course photography books and the like, but I have a soft spot for Cook Books. I just can’t have enough. Here are a few books that I got on my recent trip to Jamaica (except the one by Enid Donaldson). I absolutely adore the book called Jamaican Food, that documents the origin of certain foods that are a big part of the culture and some foods/dishes that are unique to Jamaica. I’ve never had a book like this before. Clearly, I have some reading and cooking to do!

 

Lyn’s Jamaican Treasures

 

I’m happy to be back! I feel like giving my kitchen a big hug!

Take good care everyone! *Virtual Hugs for you all*

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